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January Jarring!

Well another month in lockdown has gone by but we’ve been very busy jarring honey! The warmer days in the last week have seen the bees making the most of the sun, they’ve been really active and have been finding the first snow drops that are just coming into flower.

As promised in last months blog I’m going to talk you through how we get the honey in the jar! Extracting honey is a different topic and we will cover that in the summer when we are extracting this years honey! This month as well as our own honey we have been busy jarring honey for another honey brand, we have done around 4,000 jars for them so far.


The Jarring Process!

The honey comes to us in 30lb buckets, although in the next couple of weeks we will be expanding so we can take barrels of honey. Barrels of honey are standard amongst big producers and hold 300kg of honey.

As soon as we get the honey, we put it straight in the warmers, they allow us to carefully warm the honey to around 40 degrees being careful not to go over 40 which would impact the taste and quality of the honey.

In the photos above you will see:

Top Left: The buckets of honey sat waiting to be jarred, each one is enough to fill around 60 jars.
Top Right: Inside the warmer, our warmer holds 15 buckets, 5 on each level. there is a heater above and below to ensure they all warm evenly
Bottom Left: The jarring machine uses gears to push just the right amount of honey out into the jars! It can take any size jar, we simply tell it how much to dispense and then calibrate it with the first few jars, we check every 10th jar to make sure nothing has changed and the jars are being filled properly!
Bottom Right: The jars packed into boxes and palletised ready to go out to the customer!

As honey naturally crystallises the buckets are sometimes solid, it can take just hours to get the honey runny enough to jar and other times it can take several days to a week. We will check the honey several times everyday and jar it as soon as it’s clear so that we aren’t warming the honey for longer than we need to!

The honey buckets are emptied into a tank that holds about 75kg and it’s piped directly into the jarring machine. We push the jar under and it automatically dispenses the correct amount of honey, we add the lid and make sure its on tight before adding the anti-tamper labels, best before dates and main label.

The other type of honey that’s very popular is Soft Set, it’s a silky-smooth white honey that is perfect to spread. This honey is a bit trickier to get right. We can start with any sort of honey, we warm it up so it is completely runny there can’t be any granules, we then add around 10% of soft set honey to the runny honey. Over the next few days of stirring, the runny honey starts to set like the soft set honey we added. We then jar it and the honey sets over the next few days, ready for you to enjoy on your toast!


This Month’s Reci-Bee!

Honey, Ginger & Pumpkin Seed Scones

(Adapted from National Trust Book of Scones by Emma Taylor)

Ingredients:

500g Plain Flour
2 tsp Baking Powder
100g Caster Sugar
1 tbsp Ground Ginger
125g Butter/Margarine
25g Grated Ginger
3 tsp Pumpkin Seeds
2 tbsp Runny Honey (or honey of your choice)
1 large egg, beaten
Approx. 150ml Milk (or milk alternative)

I LOVE a scone, I think they are super simple to make and are perfect for elevenses or with a cup of tea in the afternoon! In a perfect world I would make these to share with family, however I will have to sit and indulge myself with a cup of tea and a film! This recipe lends itself to Holt Hall Apiary’s Runny Honey, but for an extra Ginger kick for the fiery ginger lovers out there, feel free to use Ginger Infused Honey . Or this will give a beautiful flavour if you used the newest development – Lemon Infused for the perfect pairing of Lemon & Ginger!

Method:

Step 1 – Preheat the oven to 190°C/180°C fan. Line a baking sheet with greaseproof paper.

Step 2 – Sieve the flour, baking powder, sugar and ground ginger into a mixing bowl. Using your fingertips, rub in the butter until the mixture resembles fine crumbs. Stir in the pumpkin seeds.

Step 3 – Add the honey, beaten egg, grated ginger and milk to the bowl and mix to make a soft dough (you may not need all of this, save it for brushing the tops of the scones).

Step 4 – Turn out onto a lightly surface, and gently press with your hand, until the dough is 4cm thick (it’s thicker than you realise! My first attempt was too thin!!). Stamp out with a 7cm cutter (your choice on smooth or crimped edges). Any trimmings, bring together to form more scones (waste not want not!).

Step 5 – Brush the tops with milk, or a little egg if you have any left, and bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.

Step 6 – Delicious warm, with butter or more honey!

Would love to see pictures, please share them to info@holthallapiary.co.uk.

Thank you for reading our blog, hopefully you’ll have a good idea of how your honey got into it’s jar! I’m looking forward to sharing the process of how we get the honey directly from our hives to you when the season starts!

Matthew Ingram
Holt Hall Apiary

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